Quantcast Section VIII. MEASURES TO SAFEGUARD STABILITY

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TM 55-1915-200-SDC
Section VIII. MEASURES TO SAFEGUARD STABILITY
5-26.  STANDARDS. The ship meets a single compartment standard in conformance with U.S. Coast Guard rules,
including the engine room.
5-27.  STABILITY CONDITIONS. Seven damage stability conditions are analyzed in the Damage Stability Booklet to
provide the ship's personnel an understanding of the LSV's capability to withstand damage resulting in flooding. Two
loading conditions are investigated, full-load departure and full-load arrival.
5-28.  WEIGHT AND MOMENT COMPENSATION. Any increase in the weight of the ship must be avoided since the
single compartment standard must be preserved. Weight compensation by weight removals is required before any
weight is added. These removals can be made from any level as stability is not critical.
5-29.
LIOUID LOADING INSTRUCTION. Diesel oil may be drawn from any tank in any sequence.
5-30.  WATERTIGHT INTEGRITY. The maintenance of watertight integrity is essential to developing full resistance to
underwater damage. It is essential to maintain the watertight bulkheads and watertight doors (including doors to main
deck storerooms, laundry room, workshop, damage control locker, machinery room, emergency generator room, and
physical fitness room).
5-31.
PROCEDURE AFTER DAMAGE.
CAUTION
Every effort should be made to confine the flooding.
STEP ONE
ESTABLISH FLOODING BOUNDARIES as close to the area of damage as possible.
STEP TWO
DEWATER ANY FLOODED SPACES ABOVE THE MAIN DECK whose boundaries can be made sufficiently
tight. First action should be to drain off any flooding water which may have entered the main deck store rooms if this can
be made sufficiently watertight.
STEP THREE
SIZE UP THE SITUATION before taking further action. As previously stated, there is every expectation of
survival after any single compartment has been flooded, provided the limiting drafts were not exceeded prior to damage.
Even after such damage, the principal danger is not the loss of stability but the loss of reserve buoyancy. Under any
condition of damage in which the ship remains
5-13


 


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